While it’s easy for businesses with actual products to organically direct the eye toward possible purchases with their web design, this isn’t quite so simple for businesses which sell services.

When you’ve got products to sell, you just design the site in an easy to view way and make it simple for visitors to skim through products.

In this way the product almost sells itself.

Amazon has the addition of reviews and related purchases to drive sales and funnel prospective buyers into position. This can’t be done in quite the same way with services from a given business.

In that scenario, you’re actually more concerned with drumming up leads than you are with sales.

Services are often ongoing.

Visually Kinetic Services Page

A client purchasing your services may remain a loyal customer for years. So when you’re selling, you don’t want to pressure potential loyal customers. You don’t want to badger them. You’re trying to plant a seed—a seed that allows your business into their lives.

It takes about seven contacts before someone has made their way through the “sales funnel” to a sale.

Converting on your services page usually takes up to 7 contacts

That’s an average, of course; it’s not representative of every sale every time. But it is a good number to start from. You should have this kind of thinking characterizing your strategy pertaining to page design.

You want a sort of motion—a visual kinetic nature—which prompts the eyes to move toward clicking on those links which lead visitors toward the right information. But you don’t want too much motion, or you’re going to scare away your prospects.

Going Beyond HTML

If you really want to get your head around this, consider early HTML sites from the late nineties up until about 2007.

These websites had a great number of .gifs, and usually a busy color scheme.

Remember MySpace.com?

People had so much fun designing backgrounds and eye-popping layouts! But it didn’t look professional, did it?

Well, many websites do similar things without realizing it.

They hear “eye-popping”, so they put some kind of .gif on display. Users find it, immediately feel the site is unprofessional, and usually move on to some other website offering similar services. 

Here’s the key: they don’t even read the content.

When a website has visuals that are too busy, it activates memories in a visitor’s brain. Everybody has been to sites that had viral popups.

Beyond clogging up your browser and making it impossible to surf the web, it’s just downright irritating to encounter such sites. If yours is like that, you are actively discouraging users.

Several things you can do to reverse this when working on your services page include:

  • having an easily accessible menu for navigation,
  • having a great deal of white space characterize a given page (this is easy on the eye),
  • getting your content into the upper half of your services page—above the fold, as they say—
  • and including strong CTAs, or Calls To Action.

With services, your CTA is usually going to be something like:

“to find out more”

or

“contact an agent”

You might have something that reads like: “calculate estimate”, or “average costs”. It all depends on your industry.

Mobile Devices And Collaboration

A final consideration you should at least throw around pertains to sites which have a “desktop” and a “mobile” version.

Smartphones, tablets, laptops, smart watches, smart cars, and even smart refrigerators are becoming worldwide staples describing the Internet of Things. These devices also usually have different visual formats than desktops.

Your services page should be visible on as many mobile devices as possible, and easy to navigate as well. This trend toward mobile internet usage is only increasing, so getting on board now makes a lot of sense. It’s a trend that will certainly be more regulated later.

Services page on different screen sizes

Another considerable strategy is collaborating with web designers to create the most effective website. Your web designers are going to know the market when it comes to popular website trends. They’ll know whether a split background is a better idea than a static white one. They’ll know where to put links, what terms like “above the fold” are in reference to, and things like that.

Your web designers are going to know the market when it comes to popular website trends. They’ll know whether a split background is a better idea than a static white one. They’ll know where to put links, what terms like “above the fold” are in reference to, and things like that.

They’ll know whether a split background is a better idea than a static white one. They’ll know where to put links, what terms like “above the fold” are in reference to, and things like that.

But you know your clients better. You know where they’re coming from, and why they might buy your services. If you’re collaborating with your web designers directly, between the two of you it should be possible to design a site which is positively visually kinetic and is additionally useful to clients, leading to more conversions.

 


 

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